Action Needed to Address Dead Zone

Contact: 
Matt Rota, Gulf Restoration Network
(504) 525-1528
Tracy Kuhns, Louisiana Bayoukeeper
(504) 289-7162

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
 
Contacts:
Matt Rota, Gulf Restoration Network, (504) 525-1528
Tracy Kuhns, Louisiana Bayoukeeper, (504) 289-7162
 
GROUPS SLAM LACK OF ACTION TO ADDRESS DEAD ZONE
 
New Orleans, LA – Local conservation and fishing organizations voiced strong displeasure today with the lack of progress that has been made to address the size of the Dead Zone in the Gulf of Mexico.  At a meeting of the Task Force made up of state and federal agencies, groups questioned why more than six years after an action plan was released, little action has taken place to reduce the size of the dead zone.
 
Organizations also expressed concern that increased corn production to fuel the ethanol boom may have a negative effect, causing the Dead Zone to increase in size.  “To me, the Dead Zone represents an instance of Louisiana and the Gulf paying the price for the nation’s needs,” said Jeff Grimes, Assistant Director of Water Resources for the Gulf Restoration Network.  “Subsidized corn production in the Midwest could lead to increased Dead Zone-causing fertilizer pollution in the Mississippi River.  At the same time, there has been no significant federal funding or action to reduce the Dead Zone.”
 
“People keep talking about the costs of implementing pollution control, but I want to know the economic and social costs of not doing anything about the Dead Zone,” said Tracy Kuhns, Louisiana Bayoukeeper. “Our children and grandchildren deserve to be able fish in the Gulf and enjoy its resources, just like we do.”  “If nothing is done, we could see a collapse of our Gulf fishery, the largest in the lower 48 states.”
 
“There are solutions to this problem that we can begin to implement right away,” stressed Matt Rota, Water Resources Program Director for the Gulf Restoration Network.  “The first step is for the Environmental Protection Agency and states to set standards for how much nutrient pollution we allow in streams that eventually flow into the Gulf. We should also be installing technology on our sewage treatment plants to remove pollution and offering more incentives to farmers to reduce fertilizer runoff from fields.”
 
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The Gulf Restoration Network is a coalition of environmental, social justice, citizens' groups, and individuals committed to restoring the Gulf of Mexico to an ecologically and biologically sustainable condition.  Visit our website at www.healthygulf.org
 
 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contacts:
Matt Rota, Gulf Restoration Network, (504) 525-1528
Tracy Kuhns, Louisiana Bayoukeeper, (504) 289-7162 

GROUPS SLAM LACK OF ACTION TO ADDRESS DEAD ZONE

New Orleans, LA – Local conservation and fishing organizations voiced strong displeasure today with the lack of progress that has been made to address the size of the Dead Zone in the Gulf of Mexico.  At a meeting of the Task Force made up of state and federal agencies, groups questioned why more than six years after an action plan was released, little action has taken place to reduce the size of the dead zone.  

Organizations also expressed concern that increased corn production to fuel the ethanol boom may have a negative effect, causing the Dead Zone to increase in size.  “To me, the Dead Zone represents an instance of Louisiana and the Gulf paying the price for the nation’s needs,” said Jeff Grimes, Assistant Director of Water Resources for the Gulf Restoration Network.  “Subsidized corn production in the Midwest could lead to increased Dead Zone-causing fertilizer pollution in the Mississippi River.  At the same time, there has been no significant federal funding or action to reduce the Dead Zone.”

“People keep talking about the costs of implementing pollution control, but I want to know the economic and social costs of not doing anything about the Dead Zone,” said Tracy Kuhns, Louisiana Bayoukeeper. “Our children and grandchildren deserve to be able fish in the Gulf and enjoy its resources, just like we do.”  “If nothing is done, we could see a collapse of our Gulf fishery, the largest in the lower 48 states.”

“There are solutions to this problem that we can begin to implement right away,” stressed Matt Rota, Water Resources Program Director for the Gulf Restoration Network.  “The first step is for the Environmental Protection Agency and states to set standards for how much nutrient pollution we allow in streams that eventually flow into the Gulf. We should also be installing technology on our sewage treatment plants to remove pollution and offering more incentives to farmers to reduce fertilizer runoff from fields.” 

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The Gulf Restoration Network is a coalition of environmental, social justice, citizens' groups, and individuals committed to restoring the Gulf of Mexico to an ecologically and biologically sustainable condition.  Visit our website at www.healthygulf.org

 

Media Inquiries

Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 2245
New Orleans, LA 70176

Physical Address:
330 Carondelet, Suite 300
New Orleans, LA 70130

Contact:
Dustin Renaud, Communication Director
Phone: 504-525-1528 ext. 214

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